Taxi Common / Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ)

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Here at TaxiFareFinder, we receive many taxi related questions. We wanted to summarize the questions and our responses here.


Can I reserve a taxi in advance?

Yes! You can call any taxi company and request for a pick up for a certain day and time. This is a service that is generally free. The reliability, cost (if there is any), quality of service, may depend on taxi companies, so make sure of the reputation of the company you are calling.


Do taxis accept credit cards?

Taxi companies in larger cities generally accept credit card and are often manated by the city ordinances to do so. (Boston, Chicago, New York, Washington DC, etc.) However, even in these cities, you may want to check with the taxi driver before the trip, so there are no misunderstandings. Some drivers prefer to not accept credit cards as they may be independently responsible for the transaction fees.

In smaller cities, credit cards are less often accepted. You want to check in advance, before the trip, or at the time you call for a taxi. In some cases, the taxi company may accept a payment upfront for a flat fee pricing. Always ask!


Is the fare shown for one person? How much for multiple passengers?

Taxi fares are  priced for the trip regardless of the number passengers (up to the capacity of the vehicle). Some cities and taxi companies have fees for additional passengers, and they are about $1.00~2.00 each. This is assuming all passengers are picked up at the same location and going to the same location. Various other rules exist for multiple parties sharing a cab to and from different locations.

* There are exceptions with flat-rates where the taxi may charge per person.


Are there larger vehicles available for taxis other than regular sedans? What about vans? Buses? (for luggage or additional passengers)

Yes, in most US cities, taxis come in various sizes. If you are at a major airport, you need to request one at the taxi stand or wait for one in queue. At a smaller airport, we recommend you call a taxi company in advance to ask for a specific size. There may be additional fees.

Remember that sedans (i.e. regular car) can carry 4 passengers and has trunk space for your luggage.  Vans can hold 6+ people plus luggage. If you have more passengers, you will need to have multiple taxis, at which point, it may be more economical to hire a car service with larger vehicles.


Hi, TaxiFareFinder, I would like to reserve a cab!

TaxiFareFinder is not a taxi company or affiliated with one.  Therefore, we can not reserve or dispatch a taxi for you.  Please check with your local taxi company!


I have small children, toddlers, and babies.  Do taxis have car seats?  Do I need car seats?

An excellent article here. TFF Newsroom: Taking Taxis with Infants, Toddlers & Young Children.


How much should I tip the taxi driver?

An excellent article here. TFF Newsroom: How to Tip Your Taxi Driver.


What do I do if left something in the taxi?

Coming soon

 

…we will continue to add more as necessary.  Stay tuned!

Click here for TaxiFareFinder Frequently Asked Questions (FQ)

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How TaxiFareFinder’s Rates are Calculated

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TaxiFareFinder’s taxi fare calculation is based on a proprietary algorithm that takes into account multitude of considerations. It is not based solely on the distance and duration of the trip like other calculators available on the web.

TaxiFareFinder utilizes up-to-date taxi rates from over 200 localities, covering thousands of cities. This information is carefully and constantly monitored for its accuracy, by our staff and our supporters from the active taxi community.

Your actual fare may vary depending on unforeseen factors, such as inclement weather, unusual traffic congestion, and even your driver’s driving habits; however, under normal driving conditions, our fares are known to be very accurate. If you found your fare to be different from our estimate, please let us improve our algorithm by clicking on, “Disagree?” button and submitting your fare. Your submission will be incorporated into future calculations.

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Front or Back Seat of a Taxi?

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During my sophomore year of college I was given the opportunity to study a semester abroad and of course wanting to get as far away as possible I chose to go to Melbourne, Australia for six months! I loved my time spent with the Aussies and of course learned many new tidbits both inside and outside of the classroom. One tidbit that truly stuck with me, probably because I found it quite odd, was that if you were to hail a taxi cab you were expected to ride in the front seat. If you had multiple members in your party you would fill in the front seat first and then continue onto the back seats. This was the exact opposite of the taxi etiquette that I learned in NYC, so I decided to do a bit of research to find out why this rule differs in varying countries.

It turns out that in certain countries especially Australia, New Zealand, The Netherlands, and Scotland it is very impolite to sit in the back seat first as the driver views it as an indication of non-egalitarianism. In other words the driver will think you are stuck up if you sit in the back. Even more fascinating is that due to this fact some drivers will take you “the longer route” to your destination if you sit in the back than in the front. One of my friends from the Netherlands even said that “If you are a lone person, especially a male, it is the proper etiquette that you sit in the front seat so that you can talk about sports and life with the driver”. Seeing how my only real taxi experience before Melbourne was NYC, I was quite amazed that a driver would actually want a passenger to sit up front! From my experiences in NYC many drivers have their front seats filled with newspapers and their lunches and tend to be hesitant to move their stuff for a passenger to fill the front seat, let alone chat you up the entire ride! To be fair however, many drivers also prefer passengers to sit in the back for safety reasons in many areas.

It is interesting how countries and even cities around the world can have such differing views on simple topics such as sitting in the front or back seat of a taxi cab. Has anyone else ever run into a similar situation as mine? Does anyone prefer the front or the back? Please share your stories as we are always eager to hear them!

For more information on Taxis and Rideshare companies around the world especially to compare fare prices check out RideGuru

Lilly is an Intern at TaxiFareFinder

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How to Resolve a Taxi Fare Dispute

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It’s the moment when your taxi driver gives you the final price for your cab ride, and it is significantly higher than you expected.  It is hard to not instantly get angry and overreact, convincing yourself that the driver is attempting a scam.  However, in a fare dispute, it is essential to stay calm and polite and attempt to understand the reason for the charges.

Many taxi fare disputes can be attributed to the fact that there are various charges that can be incurred during a taxi ride and how they are not publicized and common knowledge.   Such charges include: flag drop, per mile charge, wait time, toll charges, airport fees, and others.  Many of these costs are not even added to the total until the very end of a ride, so oftentimes, it appears you are being charged excessively and unfairly.  Many taxis post the taxi rates, fees, and sample fares; however, they are often not standardized, calculations are complex with various factors, and through unfamiliar streets, figuring it out is quite a challenge.

So, what to do when in the middle of a fare dispute? 

Ask for a receipt, right away.  Taxis are required by law to produce a receipt when requested.  This will display the initial fare, metered fare, tolls and any additional fees incurred during your ride.   With the receipt, you should be able to identify where you could have been overcharged or where you were fairly charged but unaware.

Collect all information. If the taxi driver cannot or will not produce a receipt that itemizes charges, then you may have a problem.  However, remain calm, you can still help yourself.  At this point, it is important to collect and record as many details as possible.  Document the cab company, cab vehicle number, the name of the cab driver, and the medallion or license number. (Most of these information can be found on the dash of the car.)  Also, write down the date, time, and beginning and ending addresses of your trip.  If you happen to have a camera accessible, take a picture of the final meter as well as the license number; these will both extremely useful for the authorities to determine legality and fairness in the situation.

All of these details will make your case stronger when reporting to authorities later.  After this is completed, use your judgment as to what the next step should be.  If it seems as though you will have to pay the fare to exit the situation, try to pay with a credit card, as this will leave proof of payment.  If possible, exchange personal information, name and phone number, as you would in a car accident, and then pay the fare.  Paying with cash is risky because it is unlikely that payment can be reversed or even proven, but safety comes first and paying the fare may ensure this.   If at any point during this process you feel uncomfortable or threatened, step out of the cab and ask the driver to do the same.  Freedom from the enclosed space may be beneficial for both of you.

Talk about it: to everyone! Now it is time to take matters into your own hands.  Contact the taxi commission first: you can find your city’s commission easily online by performing a general search.  Some examples of taxi authorities are: the NYC Taxi Commission, www.nyc.gov/tlc, and the Boston Police Commissioner, http://www.cityofboston.gov/police/taxi.asp.  In most regions, taxi drivers operate under their own professional licenses; use his license number to report the individual driver to the commission. The taxi commission in each city has control over the status and good-standing of each driver and has the power to ticket, penalize, suspend, and revoke the licenses of cab drivers.  Taxi drivers take this authority seriously, so it is your best shot at some sort of resolution.

If the taxi operates under an organized company, contact them too.  Utilize social media if you must: post your complaint on the company’s Facebook wall or tweet at the company.  There are plenty of forums online to share your story and discover if anyone else has had the same experience.  There is even a mobile app called Report a Taxi to submit grievances to the Taxi Commission.

Get the police involved.  If you are still unhappy with the situation, call the local police and report the incident.  Report the incident using all the details recorded and be confident and clear when explaining the situation.

Few more tips.  final piece of advice is to ask the driver for an estimated fare before beginning your trip; this will provide a frame of reference.  Do this in addition to using taxi tools, such as the TaxiFareFinder mobile app, where you can retrieve a fare estimation of a trip quickly on your smart phone and the situation could be avoided completely.  Just remember: give the driver the benefit of the doubt and a chance to explain the charges, but if you truly disagree with the fare, stand up for yourself!

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