Calculate your UberPool or Lyft Line Ride with RideGuru

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RideGuru, a fare comparison calculator, just announced that they are now supporting UberPool, Lyft Line, and Ola Share rides! With many of these shared rides costing between 20-40% less than traditional services like Uber X or Lyft, it will be interesting to see how many people choose savings over comfort.

According to this blog post by Uber, in the first two years after releasing UberPool, riders requested more than 250 million UberPool rides and globally 20% of all Uber rides completed are through UberPool. Now that travelers have an easy way to compare the cost of various shared rides with other standard services, we wonder if that number will increase further.

Apart from adding shared rides, RideGuru also added a number of smaller rideshare companies to their site to give users more options when selecting a ride. Many of these smaller rideshare companies also help to fill certain niches like women only, airport rides, or rides specially designed for kids.

To learn more view the full Press Release here.

To view a Text Only Press Release please see below.


BOSTON, MA, June 25, 2017

RideGuru took on a major expansion, adding more than 50 rideshare companies to their site. RideGuru’s mission has always been to bring transparency to the rideshare market by providing reliable fare estimates for rideshare and taxi companies around the globe.

With the recent boom of smaller, more niche rideshare companies, this transparency is more important than ever. Consumers now have multiple choices for ground transportation travel in almost every city around the world. RideGuru helps to cut through the chaos by bringing a fair and equal voice to the smaller companies.

Lillien Kenyon, the business and operations lead at RideGuru, expands on RideGuru’s mission saying, We have always wanted to create a fair platform for all rideshare companies, big and small. With a few big players dominating the rideshare scene, it can be difficult for some of the smaller companies to be seen, even if they have competitive pricing or fill a unique niche. Through our addition of many of these smaller rideshare services, customers can get an unbiased look at the current marketplace and choose the transportation company that best suits their needs”

Not only is the rideshare market booming with new companies, it is also seeing a shift toward shared rides. Consumers are willing to share rides with strangers if it means a cheaper fare. RideGuru, to accommodate this trend, has added UberPool, Lyft Line, and Ola Share estimates in their Fare Comparison Calculator. With this new addition, users are able to see how much they can save by taking a shared ride over an Uber X or traditional Lyft.

Ippei Takahashi, the CEO/President of Unleashed, LLC, states, “This feature has been one of the biggest asks from our users, as the pricing rules for shared rides are very cryptic and difficult to estimate. While these offerings by Uber and Lyft are still unproven, this can be a very promising option for users to save money.  Are users willing to take longer trips and sacrifice comfort for cheaper fares?  We are thinking yes, but it may be limited to certain demographics.”

Takahashi also adds, “At RideGuru, we strive to be the most reliable and comprehensive resource for people who utilize on-demand ground transportation. Supporting UberPool, Lyft Line, and many of the smaller ‘challengers’ shows our commitment to this mission.”

For a full list of the companies that are currently supported on RideGuru click here.

About RideGuru

RideGuru, a product of Unleashed, LLC, is an all-inclusive rideshare and taxi information source.

RideGuru is not another transportation service, instead, it is a free search engine to help you find the best ride from point A to point B. It scours rates from hundreds of services worldwide to bring you the best deals.

About Unleashed, LLC

Unleashed, LLC is a Boston-based technology company that specializes in creating websites and smartphone applications to provide users with the information they need for daily decisions. The company is best known for creating the popular travel site TaxiFareFinder, released in 2007, is an online resource for all things related to taxis and rideshares. TaxiFareFinder is best recognized for its groundbreaking, location based, taxi and rideshare fare calculators.




Help Us to Keep Rideshares Transparent!

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With the release of our new site, RideGuru, the TaxiFareFinder/RideGuru team has become passionate about bringing transparency to the ridesharing community. Rideshares, such as Uber and Lyft, have their benefits but they also can be hampered by a lack of transparency.

Take a look at the video below to see how RideGuru is helping to bring insight into the ridesharing industry and let us know your thoughts below!

Uber: How to Download and Use the Uber App

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  1. Download the Uber app from the app store on your smartphone. Uber is available for download on: iPhone (iOS 7 or newer), Android (Jelly Bean or newer), BlackBerry (BB OS 7 only), Windows Phone 8.
  2. Create an account. Once you have downloaded the Uber app, you will be asked to create an account. Enter your name, email address, phone number, and credit or debit card information. Be sure to enable location services when the option appears, as this will allow for more accurate GPS capabilities when requesting a ride. Once you have filled in your account details read Uber’s terms and conditions to make sure that you are OK with Uber’s terms and privacy policy before continuing on with the service.
  3. Click the Sign Up button. Once you have filled in your account details and read over the terms of service, click the sign up button. Your account will be created and you will be sent an email confirming your new Uber account. You’re now ready to start using Uber.
  4. Fill in the details for your first ride. Once you have completed your account creation, you are ready to take your first ride! You will need to set your pickup location; an address will be auto-populated based on your GPS location but double check to make sure that it is accurate. You can input an address manually if it is incorrect. Next, you will need to choose which level of service you want. Uber offers several types of services based on vehicle type, size, and cost. For the full list of Uber services with descriptions please click here.
  5. Request your ride. Once you submit your request, a nearby Uber driver will be notified of your pickup location. A time estimate will be provided and you will be able to watch your Uber car arrive utilizing the driver’s GPS location. All details surrounding your driver and ride will be provided, including: driver photo, contact information, vehicle make, and license plate number. If you need to give your driver any additional details, you can contact your driver at this stage!
  6. Enter your end destination. Input the address of your final destination while you wait for your ride to arrive. This will save time and provide a route ahead of time.
  7. Enjoy your ride. Once you see your Uber ride approaching your pick up location on your Uber app, start looking out for your Uber car. Once you locate your ride, simply hop in the vehicle. The GPS will provide the driver with a route, but you are able to suggest a better way if you wish. Once you arrive at your destination, simply exit the vehicle. The trip cost will be taken out of your debit or credit card automatically. If you wish to tip, you may do so in cash. Once your ride is over your will receive a receipt via email with a breakdown of the ride, including fare and route explanation.
  8. Rate your experience. Once your ride is marked as complete, you will be prompted to rate your Uber drive. The rating is out of 5 stars, keep in mind Uber drivers must maintain a 4.6 rating in order to be eligible to drive for Uber.


Extra help articles on Uber:

Please click here to learn about Uber’s Surge Pricing

Please click here to learn how to calculate the price of your Uber ride.

Find your Uber Fare with UberFareFinder (Video)

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New to Uber? Need an Uber estimate? Want to avoid Surge Pricing? Check out!

With, you can easily find the price of your Uber ride whether you are riding in an UberX, UberXL, Uber Black, Uber SUV, and so on! UberFareFinder will estimate the price of your ride for every Uber car service available and will even display real-time surge pricing so you can better decide which ride is right for you. Once you have chosen your Uber car choice, you can even dispatch your ride straight from UberFareFinder.

To learn more about, check out this helpful tutorial!

Uber: How to Calculate Your Fare

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Have you ever wondered how Uber calculates their fares? Maybe you have questioned why sometimes after a really short ride you are still charged as much as some of the longer trips you’ve taken? There are a few key components that go into calculating and estimating an Uber Fare, and we are here to explain each factor, as well as how they work together to create the Uber pricing formula.


How is My Uber Fare Calculated?

Your Uber fare is first based on 4 main criteria:

  • Base (or initial) fare – A flat fee charged at the beginning of every ride
  • Cost per minute – How much you are charged for each minute you are inside the ride
  • Cost per mile – How much you are charged for each mile of the ride
  • Booking Fee (Formerly ‘Safe Rides Fee’) – A flat fee to cover Uber’s ‘operating costs’ (Not included for Uber’s more luxury services like UberBlack or UberSUV)

Here’s how Uber uses the 4 main criteria above to calculate your fare:

Base Fare + (Cost per minute * time in ride) + (Cost per mile * ride distance) + Booking Fee = Your Fare


Other Key Factors in Determining Your Uber Fare

There are a few more factors that will play into your Uber Fare that are not included in the 4 main criteria.

Tolls and Fees: Uber requires all passengers to pay for any tunnel, bridge, or toll charges that are incurred during the course of the ride. These charges will be added to your fare total at the end of your trip.

Uber Surge Pricing: Uber surge pricing has a scary connotation but it is actually a fairly simple and, at times, positive principal. Uber surge pricing is when Uber rates increase to guarantee reliability and availability of cars. When the demand for rides cannot be met by the number of current drivers on the road, prices will increase. This encourages more drivers to turn on their app and hit the road since they will make more money than usual. Uber will always notify you in your app before you request a ride if there is surge pricing so you will never be caught off guard. Surge pricing helps to guarantee that there is always a ride available, if you are willing to pay the price!

Your Uber fare, with surge pricing, is calculated by multiplying your total fare (before tolls) by the surge price multiplier. For instance if the surge amount is at 2x your total fare will be doubled, if the surge amount is 3x your total fare will be tripled.

Surge Pricing Example: If your total fare at the end of your trip is $12 and there was a 2x surge in effect, your new total would be $24. Then Uber would add on any incurred tolls.

For more information on Uber Surge Pricing visit this help article here.

Uber Minimum Fare: To encourage drivers to pick up short rides that will not yield much profit, Uber sets a minimum fare for each service. This helps to fairly reimburse drivers for short rides. If the combination of the above criteria results in your fare being lower than the minimum fare, you will be charged the minimum fare price instead. The minimum fare amount changes from city to city.

Minimum Fare Example: It is raining and you decide to take an UberX only two blocks down the street to stay dry.  After your trip ends and you add up the four different variables (as shown above), you calculate that your fare would only be $3.24. But in your area, the minimum fare for UberX is $5, so you will be charged $5 instead of $3.24.


Uber Fare Prices Vary Based on City & Car Service


Image result for uber cars






The four main criteria factors that we outlined in section 1 (base fare, cost per minute, cost per mile, and booking fee) all vary from city-to-city, and across the many Uber services (UberX, UberXL, UberSUV, UberBlack, etc). To learn more about the differences between each Uber car service visit this help page here.

Now that you understand all the factors that go into your Uber Fare and how time-consuming it would be to calculate it on your iPhone calculator, try UberFareFinder’s Fare Calculator! UberFareFinder will calculate your Uber fare using all of these factors with one easy click of a button. UberFareFinder will even include real-time surge pricing estimates and allows you to book your Uber car straight through the site!

Happy Travels!

All-In-One Uber Guide

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Confused by the numerous ride options offered by Uber? No worries – we’ve compiled an infographic breaking down each option by car type, number of passengers, and more criteria. Happy riding!


Uber Fare Finder; Find, Estimate, & Dispatch Your Ride!

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Need an Uber estimate? Want to know if Uber is surging in your area? Check out our brand new site,! Our team here at TaxiFareFinder has been working hard to create a one stop shop for everything you need to know when you travel with Uber. UberFareFinder not only will estimate your Uber fare, it will also warn you if surge pricing is enacted in your area. This allows our visitors to see what their “real-time” fare is so you can choose the best ride option available. Once you have found an estimate you like, UberFareFinder allows you to dispatch a car directly from the site! Check it out.

When you first visit, you will notice two blank fields, your “starting location” and “ending location”. This is where you will enter your Uber trip details, keep in mind that UberFareFinder supports hundreds of cities around the world!

Pro Tip: When you enter your starting and ending locations you can use addresses, city names, landmarks, business names, zip codes, and even coordinates (latitude and longitude).

Once you have entered your starting and ending locations, UberFareFinder will estimate your fare for every Uber car service available in your area! If your location is surging, UberFareFinder will even factor the surge price into your estimate. See below for an example of a fare estimate in Boston when surge pricing was enacted.

After you have searched for your fare and found an estimate you like, simply click on the “Request Uber” button which will open your Uber app and allow you to dispatch a car without having to enter any additional information.

Have you tried UberFareFinder yet? Let us know your thoughts below. Happy Fare Finding!

Introducing UberFareFinder, LyftFareFinder, and CurbFareFinder!

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The TaxiFareFinder team is extremely excited to announce the release of our three new rideshare based websites,,, and Each of these three new websites has been created with the same standards that we hold for TaxiFareFinder and have proven to give highly accurate fare estimates for the respective rideshare companies that they represent. On top of being able to give precise fare estimates that include real-time surge and prime time pricing, users are also able to hail their desired rideshare car directly from each Fare Finder website. Once a visitor finds a ride estimate he or she likes they can simply click on a “Request Service” button, where they will be taken directly to the designated rideshare companies’ website or mobile app to dispatch a car without entering any additional information!

We are thrilled to expand our technology into the rideshare space and we hope this family of Fare Finder calculators will help to bring transparency to the taxi and rideshare industry as well as help our fans to find the best deal. Try out the new Fare Finders today to learn which rideshare company is the best option for you.

To view the Press Release please click here.


To view a Text Only Press Release please see below.


TAXIFAREFINDER EXTENDS FARE ESTIMATES TO UBER, LYFT, AND CURB, the leader in publishing taxi rates and information, has been a longtime favorite of travelers for their fare estimating tool. Now, the developer has extended its fare estimation to rideshare services, Uber, Lyft, and Curb. They are offered as three different websites,,, and

Boston, Massachusetts – March 15th, 2016 – Unleashed, LLC, the Boston based technology company best known for, announced today the release of three rideshare based websites,,, and Each website is designed to introduce users to the respective rideshare services, rates, and fare estimates in a quick and user-friendly way.

Unleashed, LLC president Ippei Takahashi states, “With accurate fare estimates for Uber, Lyft, and Curb, our team at Unleashed hopes to bring further transparency to the travel industry.  It is our goal to equip travelers, so they can be informed, plan accordingly, and travel safely.”

The fare calculation support extends internationally and to virtually all cities Uber, Lyft, and Curb operate in. The sites are also capable of producing estimates for each companies’ different rides and services, such as varying vehicle types.

In order to get a fare estimate, users simply need to enter their “origin” and “destination” locations. The users can enter not only addresses, but also city names, landmarks, business names, zip codes, and coordinates (latitude and longitude). If the users do not have the exact location, the page can suggest locations through auto-completing fields.

For the benefit of those who immediately need a ride, the fare estimates displayed are in real-time, even taking into account Uber’s surge pricing and Lyft’s prime time rates. These warnings enable users to avoid unforeseen charges, choose the best ride option available, and be informed of the cost they will incur.

Once users have found an estimate and a service they are satisfied with, they can click on a “Request Service” button, where they will be taken directly to the designated rideshare companies’ website or mobile app to dispatch a car without entering any additional information.

The new Uber, Lyft, and Curb Fare Finder calculators will be an invaluable feature for those needing to research the cost of a trip before leaving home, or for those needing to verify their fare after the fact.


About Unleashed, LLC

Unleashed, LLC is a Boston based technology company that specializes in creating websites and smartphone applications to provide users with the information they need for daily decisions. The company is best known for creating the popular travel site  TaxiFareFinder, released in 2007, is an online resource for all things related to taxis and rideshares. TaxiFareFinder is best recognized for its groundbreaking, location based, taxi and rideshare fare calculators. With taxi and rideshare rates for more than 2,000 international locations, TaxiFareFinder is the proven, trusted trip companion for travelers around the world.

Which one? Uber vs. Lyft vs. Taxi (Infographic)

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Navigating the world of rideshare services, taxis, and other transportation options is difficult these days! Not to worry – RideGuru was created to simplify all the choices and show how much each will cost. This infographic breaks down the costs of two of the major rideshare services, Lyft and UberX, as well as traditional taxi services. The costs are compared in five major cities in the United States over a three and a half mile distance.

2016 Survey Results: How Satisfied Are Uber Drivers Really?

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How satisfied are Uber drivers? This question seems to be floating around the web a lot lately and our team at TaxiFareFinder was curious to find some truthful answers! As it turns out, one of our good friends, Harry Campbell (The Rideshare Guy), was also curious to learn some answers about driver satisfaction and morale and created a survey for his network of drivers. After receiving 453 responses, his team put together a fascinating report depicting Uber drivers and how they really feel. Check out the findings below!


Every year I send out a survey to all of my drivers here on RSG.  Honestly, I’m not a big fan of filling out surveys myself, but it is a great way to get feedback from my readers and confirm trends that I’ve been seeing in the on-demand economy.

So to everyone who filled out a 2016 survey, thank you!  We sent the survey to 10,234 e-mail subscribers and got 453 responses, which is awesome, and I’ll be sending out some RSG swag to 10 lucky winners.  Scroll down to the bottom to see if you were randomly selected. I’ll also be contacting you by e-mail.

This year’s survey had some really interesting results and I’m also getting better at asking interesting questions.  So if you’re a company or start-up interested in going over the results with me or one of my staff members, please e-mail me.

For everyone else, hope you enjoy!

2016 Survey Results: Getting Started With Driving

How long have you been a driver for?

According to Uber’s own numbers, half of all drivers quit after just one year.  I was surprised to see that only 17.4% of my audience has only been driving for 0-3 months, which tells me that although there are a lot of new drivers out there, they aren’t finding the online resources like my site, rideshare Facebook groups and forums.

This also speaks to the challenges of organizing drivers since there are so many new drivers who really only talk to Uber and don’t know how to get in contact with their fellow workers.

A little quick math: If Uber currently has 400,000 drivers and half are quitting after one year, that means they need to replace about 17,000 drivers each month (200,000 drivers/12 months).  And if they’re growing at a monthly rate of 10.6% (they announced 162,000 drivers on 1/22/15 and 400,000 drivers on 11/3/15 – active drivers are defined in both cases by having taken at least four trips in a single month), that means they need to hire 42,000 new drivers each month.

So in order to replace the drivers that are quitting AND sustain growth, Uber needs to hire about about 59,000 drivers in total every single month.  Wow!

Where did you first hear about driving:delivering?

If you’re wondering where Uber finds all of those new drivers, this chart gives a good glimpse into that.  I’ve talked before about Uber’s main marketing channels and although I’ve always known they pumped a lot of money into their referral program, I was surprised to see that so many people ‘heard from a friend’ about driving for Uber.

Not all of these word of mouth referrals are paid referrals, but it’s impressive to see just how important the network effect is when recruiting on the supply side.  Basically by having such a large passenger base, this also helps recruiting efforts.  This is also why a lot of the smaller to mid tier ‘Uber for X’ companies have such a hard time recruiting new drivers (and they don’t have as much $$ obviously).

If you’re curious about some of the ‘other’ responses you can view those here.  The only major category I missed was Facebook ads, which is basically the same type of paid marketing as Google Ads.

Who’s Driving For Uber And Why?

Which rideshare:delivery company do you PRIMARILY drive for?Which on-demand service do you PREFER to drive for? I’ve commented many times before that most drivers prefer driving for Lyft, but they get more rides and make more money with Uber.  I think these two charts prove that pretty clearly.  Even though an overwhelming majority of drivers are primarily working for Uber and thus making more money with Uber, an equal number of them prefer Lyft to Uber.

Lyft is often mentioned in the same breath as Uber, but outside of a few select cities like SF and Austin (where Lyft claims 40% and 45% market share respectively), they don’t offer much in the way of passenger demand.  Drivers in small to mid tier Lyft markets often wait 30 minutes+ for rides and ETAs can be as high as 20-30 minutes.

But Lyft has done a great job cultivating a special relationship with drivers.  I’m not saying they’re perfect (ahem $1,000 driver bonus snafu), but when their president e-mails drivers after fare cuts to explain why Lyft had to cut fares, that says something.

Lyft has always been on the forefront of driver friendly features, but there just hasn’t been enough demand to make it a viable main option for drivers.  Imagine how many more drivers would prefer Lyft over Uber if they actually made the same amount of money as they did driving for Uber!

Who’s Doing Most Of The Work?

How many hours per week do you work on average?

Uber has obviously been in the news a lot about its controversial tactic of treating drivers as independent contractors instead of employees.  In response to the current lawsuit they’re facing in California, even Uber’s CEO Travis Kalanick has stated that Uber is best suited as a way “to fill in the gaps”, implying that employee status would not make sense for a bulk of their drivers.

Their recently released survey confirms that 50% of drivers are driving 10 hours a week or less on average.  Uber is clearly presenting driving as a secondary gig and some (Harris & Kreuger) have even called for a third class of worker since your average Uber driver doesn’t fit into the traditional employee/independent contractor boxes.  But the problem with these assessments is that they don’t take into account who’s actually doing a majority of the work.

Based off the numbers collected in our survey, we calculated that 50% of drivers are working 20 hours a week or less, but they only account for a total of 24% of the actual hours worked out on the road.  This is similar to the phenomenon we see with Airbnb ‘super hosts’ that bring in a majority of income for Airbnb with hotel style listings as opposed to private rooms or individual listings.

If you take the mid-point of hours worked (i.e. 5 hours for 0-10) for drivers in our survey and multiply it by the number of drivers you get a rough approximation of each group’s contribution to the total hours worked.

Hours Per Week # Of Drivers % Of Total
% Of All
Hours Worked
0-10 85 19% 4%
11-20 139 31% 20%
21-30 107 24% 26%
31-40 57 13% 19%
40+ 65 14% 31%

You can see pretty clearly that a majority of the work is not being done by the 0-10 or even 10-20 hours per week crowd.

This poses several questions:

  • Which group of drivers (part-timers who make up a larger % of the workforce but do less of the work OR full-timers who make up a smaller % of the workforce but do most of the work) should be given more weight when it comes to policy discussion?
  • Should a third class of worker be created for a group of workers (0-20 hours per week) that only make up 24% of all hours worked on the platform?
  • If 30+hrs/week is considered full-time, that means half of Uber’s drivers could actually be more closely associated with employee designation than the independent contractor designation based off hours worked.

Another analysis performed on Uber’s data from January of 2015 came to a similar conclusion.

Why Do Drivers Drive?

What's the most important thing to you as an on demand worker?

Uber touts the flexibility of driving for Uber all the time and it’s actually one of the points that I’ve always agreed with them on.  I don’t think most people realize just how flexible being a driver is.  I can literally turn the app on right now and get a request within 10 minutes and be making money.

Companies like Active Hours (affiliate link) even allow you to cash out your Uber earnings the same day.  So you could go out and drive a full day whenever you want and have the money in your bank account by that night.  That’s pretty damn flexible!

Satisfaction With Driving

Overall, I am satisfied with my experience driving for UBER.

When Uber announced in December that their drivers were happier than ever, I was pretty skeptical.  It didn’t pass the smell test for two reasons.

  1. Drivers are now making less than ever because of fare cuts, so even if Uber replaced their entire workforce, how could drivers who now make less money be happier?
  2. Uber has actually gotten less flexible over the past year since they now institute policies like guaranteed hourly earnings which require drivers to work certain times and accept certain percentages of fares.  If drivers care so much about flexibility, wouldn’t less flexibility mean less happiness?

Uber’s survey actually found that 81% of polled drivers said they were satisfied with the overall experience of driving for Uber — up from 78% the previous year.  Uber polled an unknown number of drivers (and received 833 responses) from 24 of Uber’s largest markets including Los Angeles, San Francisco, Chicago and New York City.

My survey was sent to 10,234 drivers and of the 453 driver responses, only 48.4% of drivers somewhat agreed or strongly agreed (my top markets also included Los Angeles, San Francisco, Chicago and New York City).  So I think my skepticism of Uber’s survey was valid.  I’d be curious to know exactly how Uber picked it’s sample size for this survey and what questions they asked (both of which were withheld from me at least).


About Harry Campbell, The RideShare Guy

Hello TFF Readers, my name is Harry Campbell and I run a blog for rideshare drivers called The Rideshare Guy and I also write about the on demand economy for Forbes.  I’ll be sharing articles from time to time on what’s going on in the world of rideshare and what you need to know as a passenger whether you enjoy taxis, rideshare or all of the above!